Do you Montessori at Home?

“We must give the child an environment that he can utilize by himself: a little washstand of his own, a bureau with drawers he can open, objects of common use that he can operate, a small bed in which he can sleep at night under an attractive blanket he can fold and spread by himself. We must give him an environment in which he can live and play; then we will see him work all day with his hands and wait impatiently to undress himself and lay himself down on his own bed.”
Maria Montessori

Maria makes it sound so easy. Just give them an environment of their own and all will be magically well with our children at home. It’s not a magic wand, but by instilling some of the Montessori values into your home may make life a little less hectic and a little more focused for all.

Create a home environment where the child has everything in his/her reach. Small things like lowering the rod in the closet or only putting clothes in lower drawers so they can dress themselves can help your children be more independent. Try keeping their dishes in low cabinets so they can set their own place at the table and a basket full of parent-approved healthy snacks in their reach.
Teach real life skills as soon as it is developmentally appropriate. Young children can help with laundry by matching socks and folding towels. Preschoolers can help with washing and peeling vegetables. As your child ages he or she can learn more sophisticated tasks such as how preparing simple meals or using tools to help with tasks around the home.
Promote concentration. Turn off the television and limit other screen time. Set your children up with materials that interest them. For example, if your child loves the stars, then provide books and puzzles to help them learn about astronomy. Keep a basket of high quality books or visit our school library to give them something to do while the tv is off. Make sure their work environment fits their needs. Some children may work best at the kitchen table and others may want to spend time in a quiet corner. Monitor their responses to their environment and adjust accordingly.
Nurture inner motivation and shy away from tangible rewards. Your praise should be specific, sincere and value effort over outcome. “I like how focused you are” or “You worked so hard” is much more effective than “good job.”
Give your child an opportunity to learn with and from peers. Schedule playdates or sign them up for a class. Interaction with peers and learning from someone other than mom, dad or the regular teacher will boost their confidence in themselves.

November 5, 2013 4:07 pm  |   Category:   |   Comments Off

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